Stitching with DMC Coloris Threads by Hannah Hand Makes.

Stitching with DMC Coloris Threads

In this post, I am sharing some different effects you can get when stitching with DMC Coloris Threads.

These threads are very similar to Variations/Varigated threads but for Coloris there are 4 distinct colours running throughout the skein. They also have a more dramatic effect than Varigated and Variations in my opinion.

dmc coloris skein and blocks of colour

*Affiliate link. If you click and purchase I may earn a small commission but I only ever recommend things I love and use myself.

Below is a blog post that shares the exact corresponding colours to each skein of Coloris threads. I think can definitely come in handy and is like a mini colour palette in 1 skein.

You can also purchase a Coloris Shade Card from Love Crafts here* which has all of the skeins you can get with a sample of each one.

If you would like some free DMC Floss Colour Palettes I have 20 for free that you can sign up for and download here.

Different Effects When Stitching With DMC Coloris Threads

In this post where I share some tips on stitching with Varigated/Variation threads (which can also apply to Coloris), I recommend stitching in full cross stitches and not using the loop method to start.

I was talking with some of the community about this and thought it would be good to show you what happens when you stitch using different methods with Coloris threads.

To stitch these blocks I used 4502; “Camelia” (yes they all have a name!) and used 2 strands.

Below is a photo of all 4 blocks together and straight away you can see the differences in each one, but let’s take a closer look.

dmc coloris skein and blocks of colours

English Cross Stitch Method: No Loop Start

The English Method is to stitch one cross at a time. I also made sure to not use the loop method at the start. Instead, I left about half an inch of thread at the back and caught it as I was stitching. This is the way I recommend you stitch when using a thread colour changes, such as Coloris.

I stitched in rows working from left to right, right to left, left to right, right to left.

dmc coloris blocks of colour
dmc coloris blocks of colour.

As you can see in the photos you can really see the 4 distinct colours and they almost gradually change (the change isn’t as gradual with Coloris as is it with Variations/Varigated).

Danish Cross Stitch Method: No Loop Start

The Danish Method is to stitch your row in half stitches and then come back over them to end up back at the start of your row. Again, I didn’t use the loop method to start. I love using this method, but not with colour changing thread.

I also stitched in rows, but this time I started at the left, half stitched across to the right, then came back to the left to finish the crosses. And repeated below.

dmc coloris blocks of colours
dmc coloris blocks of colours.

As you can see in these photos it looks on the 1st and 3rd row like there is one colour of thread at the bottom and another colour of thread going across the top. But the 2nd and 4th rows just look like ordinary thread.

English Cross Stitch Method: Loop Start

For the third block I used the English Method but this time I started using the loop method. This is where you take 1 strand of thread and fold it in half, thread your needle, start your stitch and come through the loop at the back to secure your thread.

Starting like this is my preferred way to start and I usually do it. But for colour changing thread, when you fold it in half it’s almost like you have 2 different coloured threads next to each other. This is actually a method called Tweeding and can be so fun!

I stitched in rows working from left to right, right to left, left to right, right to left.

dmc coloris thread blocks of colour
dmc coloris thread blocks of colour

I actually quite like the effect this gives; it’s almost like a tye-dyed effect. As you can see, mostly on the 1st and 4th row, this really does look like 2 totally different coloured threads on the same needle.

Danish Cross Stitch Method: Loop Start

This way of stitching using the Danish Method with a loop start gave the strangest and yet coolest effect.

I stitched in rows starting at the left, half stitched across to the right, then came back to the left to finish the crosses. And repeated below.

dmc coloris thread blocks of colours

dmc coloris thread blocks of colours.

On some of the parts of this block, this effect looks like all 4 colours are on each cross stitch. On the bottom stitches, it looks like we half-stitched using the Tweeding method. And then the top stitches look like we Tweeded again but this time used 2 different colours of threads. And then some of it looks the same as block 3.

Final thoughts

I still think block 1 is my favourite, block 2 is probably my least favourite and 3 and 4 I do love but I’m not sure if I would stitch using these methods. Maybe if I was trying to get a psychedelic/tye-dye effect I would. But for the most part, I stand by my tip of using the English Method with no loop start.

I hope this helps you decide how you will stitch with Coloris threads (or other colour changing threads). And maybe even gave you some inspiration to try this beautiful thread! I love stitching with it so much.

You can buy them from Love Crafts here* to try them out!

Extra Cross Stitch Resources

Pin for Later

Stitching With DMC Coloris Floss by Hannah Hand Makes

6 thoughts on “Stitching with DMC Coloris Threads”

  1. Thanks for showing this. I’m a ‘renewed’ cross-stitcher and learning all the right way to stitch this time…lol.
    I love the variegated colors!!!

  2. Just to let you know, you definitely CAN use loop start with two strands of thread for variegated or overdyed flosses with variegation in the colors. Here is a method of a loop start with a single strand of floss, which can be used for *any number* of strands of floss (including 2 strands) and does not mess up the warp/weft of the floss for stitching. Hope you find this helpful…..

    Thanks!

  3. Here is a second link for single strand loop start from the front of your project that can also work for 2 or more strands of floss, and will not mess up the color striping variegated/overdyed flosses tend to have.

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